May- June Events/Exhibitions

 

 

An Autobiography of Miss Wish

May 3,  I’ll be talking about “An autobiography of Miss Wish at the  2nd Biennial Reva & David Logan Photo Book Symposium  in Berkeley, California.  Register for tickets and also hear from photographers/authors  Janet Delaney, Larry Fink, Jeff Mermelstein and more.

May 25,  I’ll be giving an artist lecture at the Doc Festival in Norway which has a fantastic line up this year  including  Fred Ramos, Shahidul Alam and Rineke Dijkstra.

May 29 – June 16 –  An exhibition of An autobiography of Miss Wish will open  at Image Singulieres in Sete, France.  This will include original letters, and drawings as well as prints and a two channel video.   I’ll be at the festival from May 29 – June 2 along with my colleagues at NOOR. 

Miss Wish covear

 

 

 

January/February 2019 Events

Artist Lecture January 24 – 25,   Women in Focus:  Documentary and Citizenship Conference  sponsored by the University of South Wales,  Cardiff,  The National Museum of Wales and the European Centre for Documentary Research.    Many thanks to photographer and educator Lisa Barnard for the invitation.

 

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Exhibition February 1, 2019 Walled off: The Politics of Containment,  Founders Gallery at the Military Museums in Calgary, Canada.  The NOOR Za’atari project, which I produced with NOOR photographers Stanley Greene, Andrea Bruce and Alixandra Fazzina, is on display through May 20, 2019.    Many thanks to Curator and Professor Dona Schwartz for including the work.

 

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September events 2018

Gallery Nova
An autobiography of Miss Wish
September 13 – September 28, 2018
Zagreb, Croatia

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I’m exhibiting work in September  from An autobiography of Miss Wish as part of the Organ Vida photography festival.   The exhibition  at Gallery NOVA , a non-commercial, experimental art space,  includes original objects, drawings and personal items from Kimberly (Miss Wish) along with images and videos, some of them shot this summer.  Thanks to the brilliant Croatian curator Marina Paulenka for embracing the work and offering her vision and insight.   The videos – my first foray into multi channel projections –  were edited with Elyse Blennerhassett, a talented sound artist based in Brooklyn.

Museum of Broken Windows
September 22 – September 30, 2018
9 West 8th Street, NY, NY

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I’m delighted to be contributing two pictures as part of this pop up show highlighting the NYPD’s failed policing strategy from Stop and Frisk to more lethal forms of police violence.  Thanks to the New York Civil Liberties Union for leading the way.

“The Museum of Broken Windows is a pop-up experience in New York City, which features the work of artists from around the country. The Museum showcases the ineffectiveness of broken windows policing, which criminalizes our most vulnerable communities. The strategy of broken windows policing is outdated and has never been proven to be effective at reducing crime. For decades, communities of color have been disproportionately impacted by broken windows policing.”

The Black Boys of Dozier – Mother Jones

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As part of a project on modern day forms of slavery, I followed a group of black men who returned to the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Florida. They recalled being taken from their homes as children and sent to this school, which was more like a slave camp. Thousands of young boys, both black and white, were sent to Dozier over the years. Sometimes it was for truancy, or petty theft, sometimes no reason was given at all. Many journalists have covered this story and their reporting helped expose wrongdoing, injustice and brutality. But through it all, the stories of the black men, who received far harsher treatment, were relegated to the sidelines. Because of their diligent efforts to be heard, their story is now told in a piece published in Mother Jones magazine and on line today.

I sought these men out and followed them as they revisited the institution. They spoke about the permanent scars of this kind of racism, terror and humiliation, and how
it changed how they looked, spoke, and moved through the world. Their stories, and how they no longer felt safe in a white world that showed them violence, reminds me of how young black men from Ramarley Graham to Trayvon Martin to Jordan Davis, to the thousands of New Yorkers stopped and frisked by New York Police, are still living the legacy of slavery.

Work a day, get a minute. Preparing for Dublin Contemporary.


Seven years of photographs cut down to 60 images.
Four years of sound files cut to 56 clips laid down over 6 tracks.
A week of Final Cut madness. (thank you the ever patient Sandra Roa editor extraordinaire)
The result: Homeland 4:03 minutes. Digital Video.
Premieres September 5, 2011

Burn pits – the story of Tim Wymore

The U.S. military has created scores of toxic dump sites across Iraq and Afghanistan. Known as burn pits, these trash heaps burn night and day. Lit by jet fuel,
they spew clouds of black smoke over US bases and civilian landscapes. Hundreds, if not thousands of servicemen and women are returning home sick with respiratory problems, skin rashes, and in some cases, tumors and auto immune diseases. Some have died. A class action suit against the company contracted to dispose of trash — Kellogg, Brown and Root and Halliburton — is proceeding in federal court. The suit claims that KBR constructed open air burn pits rather than incinerators in order to increase their profit. KBR is claiming that the military was in charge. The Veterans Administration has asked doctors to look for environmental exposure when determining a diagnosis. Veterans advocates are suggesting that exposure to burn pits may be this generations’s “agent orange,” the defoliant used in Vietnam which contained dioxin.

Here is the story of one veteran who worked in and around the Balad burn pit.