Slavery Uncovered: Chicago May 21

Please join my NOOR colleague Jon Lowenstein,  director and producer Nina Alvarez,  artist Mike Genovese and the Chicago NGO community  for a workshop and public presentation on human trafficking and forced labor.

Special thanks to Leslie Thomas and her team at ArtWorks Projects for hosting.

Jon and I will be doing a radio interview with Jerome McDonnell for Chicago’s WBEZ program Worldview on May 20.

 

SlaveryUncoveredlr

Dressing for a revolution

Chicago, Nato summit, the city enforces a several mile exclusion zone, leaving protestors with no target but the police. They chase each other in circles, a kind of urban sport. Frustration builds as those on the street can’t help but realize that their chants will fall on deaf ears. Trained for restraint, yet dressed to kill, the police are simultaneously frightening and absurd. With so much at stake — will the world’s wealth continue to be used for war and destruction — and so little hope for change, the events are more like rituals, with each side dressing for the occasion.

For an all together different edit, visit my work from Chicago on BagNewsNotes where Michael Shaw provides the visual commentary.

All photos ©Nina Berman 2012,  All Rights Reserved

Fracking – New York hearings – an update

Today and tomorrow will be the last public hearings on New York State’s plan to allow hydraulic fracturing, commonly known as fracking.

Tuesday 11/29, 1-4 pm and 6-9 pm
Sullivan County Community College, Seelig Theatre, 112 College Road, Loch Sheldrake, NY 12759
Wednesday 11/30, 1-4 pm and 6-9 pm
Tribeca Performing Arts Center, 199 Chambers Street, New York, NY 10007

I’m eager to see what will happen as I’ve immersed myself in this issue since January, exploring shale gas exploration in PA.
I’ve written a few stories on the subject, see here and here and on the the blog.

Below are some recent images taken in Pennsylvania in Bradford and Susquehanna counties.
fracking

All photos ©Nina Berman 2011, All Rights Reserved, may not be copied or published without permission.

Occupy Wall Street – The Future Belongs to Crowds


Occupation Wall Street, if nothing else, is about access to public space.
As thousands of demonstrators marched to Times Square to mark the 10 year anniversary of the bombing of Afghanistan, the police shouted through bull horns, “clear the sidewalk for pedestrian traffic,“ to which the demonstrators replied, “We are pedestrian traffic!
Once in Times Square, the NYPD set up the familiar cages, forcing the crowd into geometric pockets so cars could pass and the crowd could be contained. It hardly mattered that thousands of people were crushed together with no place to move, while double decker tourist buses sailed south, uninhibited, their passengers, waving and snapping pictures.
The surreal aspect was amplified by the fact that the only time masses of people are permitted to crowd into Times Square is on New Years Eve. It’s an event usually avoided by New Yorkers but familiar to all from television footage showing festive and expectant throngs looking skyward, huddled together in the cold, waiting to be entertained, waiting for the ball to drop, waiting in a fundamental way, to be released. But on Oct 15, people were not waiting for anything. There was no signal, no speakers. They weren’t there to receive instructions. They weren’t there to shop. They were simply, and undeniably, there.

To see them with hand made signs, surrounded by huge advertisements of the furry penguin from Happy Feet, or the red Bank of America sign, or the giant Mama Mia poster, was so strange it made Times Square into something all together stunning. At one point, a man climbed on a pole, lit a sparkler, and the crowd sang, “This Little Light of Mine.” There amid the most intense neon per square foot perhaps in the world, someone lights a sparkler and the crowd starts singing.

Curious to see how the NYPD responds in the days ahead to Occupy Wall Street’s use of the intentional crowd in a city fully crowded. I am reminded of

Occupy Wall Street

Occupy Wall Street (OWS) is an ongoing demonstration in Lower Manhattan — a bold and audacious act to create meaningful public dialogue about economic inequality and human rights in the USA and beyond. It began September 17 when a group of young people set up camp in a small city park, normally home to construction workers on lunch break from the former World Trade Center construction site. In 21 days it has grown fantastically, and virally, spanning similar movements in the USA and beyond. Their occupation is a symbolic act, yet their demands are quite specific. Entering Zuccotti Park, where they are encamped, is a beautiful experience. People are kind, they are talking as opposed to texting, they are reading, drawing, sharing stories, listening, being human. Food is free. Help is offered. People are taking care of each other. Where in all of this is the enemy? Egyptians had Mubarek, the New York demonstrators have….. Wall Street. As Mayor Bloomberg correctly said (and he should know) Wall Street is no longer on Wall Street. The money makers and masters of the universe are spread out, holed up in their trading bunkers and investment banks all over town. Wall Street is more of a theme park now, a place for tourists to snap pictures of the gated NYSE, or a community of high priced condos where people see the demonstrators as a public nuisance. See NY Times story. here My own visual prejudices have been challenged photographing OWS. I am used to seeing the man in the suit as a symbol of the elite class, and then I saw men in suits marching with the demonstrators. I am used to thinking that when people take off their clothes and shout greed is bad, to not take them too seriously, and then Michael Shaw at Bagnewsnotes opened my eyes to my own picture. Personally, it’s been inspiring to see this energy and creativity, especially in New York, which hasn’t felt this free in decades. Here are a few images from some evening visits. For a complete set, visit NOOR . All photos ©Nina Berman 2011, All Rights Reserved

Fracking in Pennsylvania, a first look

I’ve been spending some time the last few months in Pennsylvania looking at the fracking industry (natural gas extraction) and its impact on rural life there. The rush to drill down and explode the ground in pursuit of energy is radically reshaping the landscape and the political and social structure. For some, it’s an economic windfall. For others, a personal nightmare. There are many important issues of public and private space, clean water, clean air, affordable housing, government accountability (or lack there of). In my few visits I’ve encountered some extraordinary and dedicated people. Photographically, I am just beginning, but hope to work in the region for the rest of this year if not longer. For a quick read on the issue, see my piece published in AlterNet. All photos ©Nina Berman 2011. For information contact NOOR images.

International Women’s Day — Kimberly, a work in progress

On international woman’s day I offer up a few photographs and a video of my dear friend Kim, a courageous woman I met in London in 1990 when she was a teenager living on the street fleeing sexual abuse. Kim’s been a huge part of my life ever since. She moved to New York in the early 1990’s and I’ve photographed her on and off but never published any images. I’m concerned I won’t have much time left with her, so I’ve started to organize the work — my photos and videos and her materials – drawings, poems, writings, her early family photographs, hospital reports, etc. She’s worthy of at least a book or a film. All photographs © Nina Berman.