November – December 2019 Events – News

Acknowledgment Of Danger
Passaic River, New Jersey. Photo Nina Berman, 2016 From the series “Acknowledgment of Danger”

 

EVENTS

Bronx Documentary Center
Panel Discussion: Conversations on Conflict Photography with Dr. Lauren Walsh
December 7, 2019 @ 6pm

 

EXHIBITIONS

University of Michigan
Whose Streets, Our Streets?
Women’s Studies Department
Institute for Research on Women and Gender
Exhibition closes December 13
Ann Arbor, Michigan

Susquehanna Art Museum
Aftermath:  War is Only Half the Story . (Series: Acknowledgment of Danger)
October 12, 2019 – January 19, 2020
Harrisburg, PA

 

BOOKS

My work appears in the following recently published books:

A World History of Photography,  5th Edition
By Naomi Rosenblum
Abbeville Press, 2019

Conversations On Conflict Photography
By Lauren Walsh
Bloomsbury, 2019

Documentary Photography Reconsidered
History, Theory and Practice
By Michelle Bogre
Bloomsbury, 2019

 

 

Extended Photo Caption:

The Joseph Carmine de Jessa Memorial Bridge over the Passaic River connects the towns of Lyndhurst and Nutley, New Jersey. The bridge is named after a 19 year old US Marine who died from a mortar attack while deployed as a rifleman in Quang Tri, Vietnam, 1967. The bridge spans a part of the river contaminated with dioxin from Vietnam War era Agent Orange production. During the 1960’s the Diamond Alkali Co. plant in Newark, NJ, produced Agent Orange for the US military and then dumped the surplus into the Passaic River where it settled into the riverbed stretching from Newark to Lyndhurst. The dioxin contaminated the fish and contributes to the River’s designation as a superfund site. Clean up of the dioxin and other pollutants are estimated at well over $1 billion. The bridge is in a state of disrepair and slated for eventual replacement.

February events/exhibitions

DCtriumphs
I have several public talks and screenings in New York, Washington and Warsaw, Poland during the month of February.

035_MissWish
 

Triumph of the Shill November screenings

Posterhorizontala

The short documentary Triumph of the Shill reimagines the Leni Riefenstahl 1935 Nazi propaganda classic as an aesthetic blueprint to consider the 2017 presidential inauguration and election of Donald J. Trump.

Running time:  10.22 minutes.  Directed and produced by Nina Berman

Screenings: 

New York, New York

Portland, Oregon

Ft. Lauderdale, Florida

 

Trailer:  https://vimeo.com/230103053

http://www.triumphoftheshill.com

Marcellus Shale exhibition opens in Youngstown, Ohio

Fractured: the shale playThe Marcellus Shale Documentary Project moves to Ohio at the Bliss Hall Gallery at Youngstown State University.
March 3 – April 4, 2014

The University has organized the following programs in support of the exhibition.

• Tuesday, 25 March, 7-9 p.m. | Moser 2000 | TITLE: The Science of Shale Gas: Geology, Seismology and Environmental Impacts. Dr. Ray Beiersdorfer, Professor of Geology, Youngstown State University
• Wednesday, 26 March, 7-9 p.m. | Moser 2000 | TITLE: The science of shale gas: The latest evidence on leaky wells, methane emissions, and implications for policy. | Dr. Anthony R. Ingraffea, Ph.D., P.E., Dwight C. Baum Professor of Engineering, Cornell University
• Thursday, 27 March, 5-9 p.m. | Gallery Talk / Gallery Reception | Bliss Hall 2300 | RECEPTION/GALLERY TALK: Brian Cohen, Photographer and Project Director of the Marcellus Shale Documentary Project.
• Friday, 28 March, 4-5:30 p.m. | McDonough Museum Lecture Hall | SCREENING: Triple Divide (film with Mark Ruffalo, Melissa Troutman).

CONTACT: Professor Stephen Chalmers | schalmers@ysu.edu

©Photo Nina Berman/ All Rights Reserved

The Black Boys of Dozier – Mother Jones

dozier

As part of a project on modern day forms of slavery, I followed a group of black men who returned to the Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys in Marianna, Florida. They recalled being taken from their homes as children and sent to this school, which was more like a slave camp. Thousands of young boys, both black and white, were sent to Dozier over the years. Sometimes it was for truancy, or petty theft, sometimes no reason was given at all. Many journalists have covered this story and their reporting helped expose wrongdoing, injustice and brutality. But through it all, the stories of the black men, who received far harsher treatment, were relegated to the sidelines. Because of their diligent efforts to be heard, their story is now told in a piece published in Mother Jones magazine and on line today.

I sought these men out and followed them as they revisited the institution. They spoke about the permanent scars of this kind of racism, terror and humiliation, and how
it changed how they looked, spoke, and moved through the world. Their stories, and how they no longer felt safe in a white world that showed them violence, reminds me of how young black men from Ramarley Graham to Trayvon Martin to Jordan Davis, to the thousands of New Yorkers stopped and frisked by New York Police, are still living the legacy of slavery.